So you think you can drive… the End of an Era

I was 23 when I got my Class one Heavy Goods licence (CDL), I loved driving, I just wanted the learn the skills to be able to reverse something as big and heavy as a house into the tightest space – and I did. parking trailer 7side

A few years later and I bought a very old 1978 Range Rover with a 3.5 V8 because I loved climbing and spent my spare time in the UK’s Peak District trying to navigate rocky and muddy tracks in my car.
In no time I realised there was a ton of things I just didn’t know about driving off-road – but I loved driving, so what to do?
I ended up calling the Managing Director of Land Rover directly, we chatted, I told him my plight and my fear of either damaging the environment, the car and worse still – myself.
Land-Rover-Logo--newThree days later I was standing in an office in front of a man called Don Green [in all things Four Wheel Drive – he’s a legend].
I went on to spend the whole day driving the then factory high-speed test track and the once highly renowned Land Rover Jungle Track.
I was so impressed I said to everyone they should open a school.. They said they only train people who really need to know how to use the vehicles properly in off-road environments.

Two years later and I get a call… We’re setting up the “Land Rover Experience” would you like to come along and try it out? Camel Training Eastnor
I went, I qualified as a specialist, then became the 2nd person to ever qualify as an instructor (and when you consider no other manufacturer was running these courses – that’s kinda a big deal I guess). I learned the layout in great personal detail of the proving ground tucked away at Eastnor Castle and while it’s very much a commercial sales entity these days, I loved it. So armed with all things Land Rover, a 110 and issued overly embroidered overalls – I did it for a living!
Landy-Stuff
From Camel Trophy to vehicle testing I loved this incredible mentally tough system of driving and know-how; vehicle self recovery and winching, service and repair in the field, driving through water too deep and how to do it, expedition configurations, load bearing, tires, ice and snow techniques and so on. In fact I later took a telecommunications job in Saudi Arabia just to gain extreme desert experience – and my knowledge and skills were soon taken up by various parties. One of which became an issue with the MK 2 Range Rover, I flagged it up to Land Rover and it caused a redesign of the latest version being tested in South Africa at that time.
But these are bygone days, days, month and years of fond memories. 110 camel
Of course these days I maybe a little long in the tooth for people who believe that by simple ownership of a 4X4 means it’ll just get them through any situation – it’s a bit like this: If I bought a plane does it make me a pilot?!

We tested every type of vehicle made around the world in nearly every environment – but the one single vehicle that came out of even the worse situation was this

The Land Rover Defender 110

LandyThe venerable Landy… started production 68 years ago… and it’s just about to go out of production with no immediate replacement in sight – and that is a crying shame!!
It’s sold all over the world, but not in North America because they’re built literally by hand and Land Rover originally could not cope with the extra workload.

Sure I can tell you all the well-known clichés like 70% of all Landy’s are still running, and for the majority of the world, the first vehicle they ever saw was a Land Rover… but even if you don’t own one or you do and it never sees a field, mud, sand or frozen tundra – it’s still the most iconic 4×4 in the world – few beat it, nothing can replace it and to see it stop production is not just sad – it’s wrong…

This is the shoulder that all others stand upon…

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New York City Snow Storm 2016

Blizzard 2016
The Neistat Way

Casey Neistat
Jesse Wellens
Dean Neistat
Oscar Boyston

NYC Snow (1 of 1)

NYC Snow (2 of 1)

To See the Behind the Scenes 

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Devastating few months in British Music History

 

It obviously can’t have escaped many people’s notice of the close proximity of several deaths from the archives of British Rock history.
I don’t know where to go with this other than to add my little bit:
Music for me started in 1976, it was the early days of punk and when I got to boarding school, we had an amazing teacher called Adrian Schoeberl who, once a week would introduce us to a couple of different bands until we gained a vast spectrum of knowledge in the area and even took in a Buzzcocks gig once.
It was while at home on school break I watched a show called “The Old Grey Whistle Test” (star kicker) on the BBC when, before my eyes a live concert with a school boy running around grabbed my attention Old-Grey-Whistle-Test– and there born was my love of AC/DC.
I left the school and attended another in Sheffield and this was the first time I ever saw people wearing merchandise. A kid and later a friend came up to me and asked what bands I was into and he was wearing a Led Zeppelin and a Genesis badge, I said both names and he accused me outright of just reading his badges – well yes and no, I had every album by Zeppelin and nothing by Genesis.
As we flew into the 80’s we were so lucky, Sheffield City Hall was a major venue on the UK touring circuit back then and every major act played there. We also had the Top Rank Suite, The Wapentake (a rock pub), local bands like Def Leppard, Saxon and got to see everyone. Ozzy Osbourne’s Blizzard of Oz was a show that got me interested in Audio Engineering which I was fascinated with. Girlschool made me slightly more deaf in the right ear than the left – for life!! We saw everyone. And then I worked in a Merch shop right opposite the City Hall (gone now) called Impulse Records… the only place I ever knew of back then that sold the leather, studs and bullet belts – so much so that when touring bands finished sound check at the City Hall they’d come in to buy gear on their way to the Wapentake bar just down the street. It was a great time in my life.

Then it all changed, City Halls were taken over by Arenas, the record shop became a parking lot, the Wapentake changed hands and then changed names.Wap reopening ded.The only other bar with the a Rock reputation as close or even better than the Wapentake was a long way away, in another country in fact and I knew it would be highly unlikely to ever visit…

 

And then, 3 years ago I did, with Gabby aka Gabsatrucker. In fact I mentioned it briefly in the post LA to Sin City : Las Vegas
A life time later from 1982, and we had been shooting  about picking up a few things in West Hollywood and were starving hungry… a few blocks away Rainbow Logowas this little place : The Rainbow Bar & Grill… not the kind of name or  look from the outside you would associate with a bar like the Wapentake, but I’m told the name was from the Band “Rainbow”.
So we went, we parked and we entered… got a booth and ate a hearty burger… as it got later the faces of 80’s, 90’s and early 2k’s rock scene were everywhere, I was surprised I guess, but not star struck, it was like a reassurance that such great places still exist, where people can be themselves and no pretension entered into.
Age has had a strange effect on me, whether I’m becoming an old romantic or just that little softer – but as we left and a famous individual said “sup – brother” as an informal greeting  – I knew then I would probably return.

I miss music…
And as the deaths of Phil Taylor, Lemmy, the final demise of Motorhead and David Bowie sink home having left a true mark in history, I feel that in these rare places – they will always be as alive today and in the future as they ever were.

 

Motorhead-Raw-cut-out12345

I tweaked the album artwork for the purpose of this blog

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